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    Source: Government of Japan
    Country: Japan, Mauritania

    With regard to the Great East Japan Earthquake, as of 12:00 on Thursday, June 23, 2011, Japan has received offers of assistance from the 160 countries and regions (increased from 159 in the previous press release) and 43 international organizations.

    The following country made a new offer:

    Islamic Republic of Mauritania

    (*This is a provisional translation. The above date denotes the date of the issue of the original press release in Japanese.)

    (END)


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    Source: Government of Japan
    Country: Japan, Mauritania

    In response to the Great East Japan Earthquake, the Government of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania made a donation of 138.5 million ouguiya (approximately 45.7 million yen) as relief money for Japan.

    From Mauritania, letters and messages of sympathy were sent from H.E. Mr. Mohamed Ould Abdel Aziz, President of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. In addition, words of sympathy and support have been extended at various levels. On Thursday, June 6, H.E. Mr. Hamadi Ould Hamadi, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation of Mauritania, extended words of sympathy to Mr. Hiroshi Azuma, Ambassador of Japan to Mauritania, and proposed assistance for Japan.

    The Government of Japan deeply appreciates assistance extended by the Government of Mauritania and its people.

    (*This is a provisional translation. The above date denotes the date of the issue of the original press release in Japanese.)


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  • 05/24/12--02:54: World: When Hunger Strikes
  • Source: Muslim Aid
    Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia (the), Kenya, Mali, Mauritania, Niger (the), Nigeria, Senegal, Somalia, Sri Lanka, United Republic of Tanzania (the), World

    There are many parts of the world suffering from malnutrition and hunger that adversely affect mental and physical growth of the affected individuals. Many a times, these effects are irreversible. Apart from being an unacceptable phenomenon morally, hunger also acts as an obstruction to the economic and social growth of the poorest nations. Recent food crises and economic downturns have further deteriorated the situation especially in areas like the Horn of Africa and Sahel.

    Economists attribute the growing food insecurities to factors such as decline in food stocks, population growth, volatile prices of energy and food, recent climate changes and link between current financial markets and the future of agriculture. These factors have both short and long term consequences that can push certain economies deeper into poverty.

    The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development defines poverty as a state which “encompasses different aspects of deprivation that relate to human capabilities including consumption and food security, health, education, rights, voice, security, dignity and decent work”. But poverty can’t be seen merely as an effect of hunger. Both phenomena are part of a bigger vicious circle. Poverty is one of the primary causes of hunger. It can be caused by malnutrition that affects the physical and mental capacities of people, lowering their economic productivity and outcome. Malnutrition is one of the results of extreme hunger. Thus, there runs a cycle of cause and effect that impacts the human capital as a whole.

    The development and growth of the most vulnerable of communities will seem an unachievable target until issues of hunger and malnutrition are not catered to. In this context, development essentially means combating food insecurities in order to fight poverty. Most of the international NGOs and charities work towards the common goal of alleviating poverty and responding to food security issues forms an integral part of their action plan. Providing food assistance to the poor and vulnerable can be undertaken both as a short term as well as a long term response.

    The short term responses cater mainly to countries which are currently facing a crisis or are in a post crisis situation. Such scenarios require immediate and effective mobilisation of resources for improving the nutrition levels of affected people, restoring their livelihoods, at least at the basic level, and re-establishing a zone of food security. Various tools are employed by international humanitarian agencies for ensuring these goals, including monitoring of nutrition levels, screening, treatment, restoring access to resources and services for livestock rearing and agriculture and providing supplies and cash vouchers for food to the affected populations. Muslim Aid, for instance, distributed over 80,650 food packets to the Tsunami affected regions of Sri Lanka to help restore food security.

    As a long term response, the international community has realised the importance of agriculture for tackling food insecurity and thereby, poverty. Thus, humanitarian projects to revive and promote agriculture are essential in the current global situation. Also, concentration should be more on food production for local needs rather than export in the developing countries. Social transfer also provides direct support for the vulnerable communities by allowing a better management of unprecedented shocks through provision of regular contributions or services by NGOs or the government to individuals and households. Unlike acute interventions during emergencies, these transfers, via food, voucher or money distribution, can be scheduled enabling households to keep their livelihoods intact during difficult situations like flood or drought. This will ultimately accelerate the rehabilitation process if a crisis or disaster strikes.

    Malnutrition or under-nutrition also needs to be addressed in order to break the vicious circle. Specific attention needs to be paid to women and young children who usually fall victims to malnutrition first. It is also vital for international NGOs, like Muslim Aid, to address the other aspects that cause malnutrition, such as access to drinking water, healthcare, hygiene, access to education and better livelihood opportunities etc. Therefore, the impetus falls on the international humanitarian institutions to devise plans and projects that cater to the problem of food insecurity and malnutrition for breaking the cycle that is affecting various international communities and taking a heavy toll on the individuals and the economy at large.

    The copyright of this article is held by the Information and Public Affairs Department of Muslim Aid, UK. Use of its contents is allowed subject to acknowledgement. The opinions expressed in this article are solely of the author and do not represent the point of view of Muslim Aid.

    By: Marya Jabeen, Information & Public Affairs Assistant, Muslim Aid


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    Source: Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Samoa, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe, South Sudan (Republic of)
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    In Syria, opposition forces launched a coordinated offensive in the capital Damascus for two consecutive days on 6 February. Heavy fighting was also reported in Deir Al-Zor, Daraya, Aleppo and Homs. The number of Syrian refugees continued to rise over the past week, amounting to a total of 792,118, an increase of around 59,000 newly registered refugees or individuals awaiting registration compared to last week.

    In Mali, suicide attacks and fighting were reported from the city of Gao over the last three days. Military progress in the centre and north of Mali has improved humanitarian access, although conditions remain unstable.

    213,000 people are affected by floods in Mozambique. In addition, a cholera outbreak was confirmed in the north of the country.

    On 6 February an 8.0 magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of the Santa Cruz Islands in the southeast Solomon Islands archipelago. According to Government reports, 13 people were killed and around 6,000 affected.

    A 7.0-magnitude earthquake struck southern Colombia on 9 February, injuring 15 people, destroying 100 houses and damaging some 2,000 houses, according to authorities. No information is currently available on the number of people affected.

    40,000 people are affected by heavy rains and floods in Bolivia.

    Global Emergency Overview web interface


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    Source: Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Samoa, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Turkey, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe, South Sudan (Republic of)
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    In Syria, insurgents heightened their offensive to capture airports and air bases in Aleppo, leading to intense fighting across the province. In eastern Syria, rebels captured the town al-Shaddadeh after three days of fighting that left 130 people dead and forced some 40,000 people to flee the town. The number of Syrian refugees continued to rise, amounting to a total of 830,675, an increase of around 38,500 newly registered refugees or individuals awaiting registration in a week.

    French and Malian troops continued efforts to secure Gao and its surroundings in northern Mali. Although humanitarian access in central regions and parts of the north continues to improve and aid is increasing in the accessible parts, security remains a serious threat in parts of the north due to the on-going military operations, threat of mines by armed groups, recent intra-military clashes and suicide bombings.
    Torrential rains in Peru have caused floods and landslides in the Arequipa province in southern Peru, affecting some 48,000 people. Nationwide, some 91,128 people have been affected by floods and landslides since the start of the rainy season in October 2012.

    Global Emergency Overview web interface


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    Source: Assessment Capacities Project
    Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Samoa, Senegal, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Turkey, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe, South Sudan (Republic of)
    preview


    In Syria, insurgents heightened their offensive to capture airports and air bases in Aleppo, leading to intense fighting across the province. In eastern Syria, rebels captured the town al-Shaddadeh after three days of fighting that left 130 people dead and forced some 40,000 people to flee the town. The number of Syrian refugees continued to rise, amounting to a total of 830,675, an increase of around 38,500 newly registered refugees or individuals awaiting registration in a week.

    French and Malian troops continued efforts to secure Gao and its surroundings in northern Mali. Although humanitarian access in central regions and parts of the north continues to improve and aid is increasing in the accessible parts, security remains a serious threat in parts of the north due to the on-going military operations, threat of mines by armed groups, recent intra-military clashes and suicide bombings.
    Torrential rains in Peru have caused floods and landslides in the Arequipa province in southern Peru, affecting some 48,000 people. Nationwide, some 91,128 people have been affected by floods and landslides since the start of the rainy season in October 2012.

    Global Emergency Overview web interface


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    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Country: Angola, Burundi, Chad, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, United Republic of Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Afghanistan, Indonesia, Iraq, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Maldives, Sri Lanka, Haiti, Russian Federation, Mozambique, Zambia, Burkina Faso, Senegal, Cameroon

    AFRICA: In eastern Africa, heavy rains and floods have caused loss of life and destroyed crops and infrastructure in several countries. However, prospects for current crops have improved. In southern Africa, cereal import requirements in 2005/06 (excluding South Africa) are estimated about 30 percent higher than last year due to substantially reduced harvests in Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe. South Africa, on the other hand, is estimated to have more than enough exportable surplus of maize to meet the import needs of the subregion. In western Africa, the food situation has been deteriorating in countries of the Sahel affected by desert locusts and drought, notably in Mali, Mauritania and Niger. Funds and food aid are urgently needed to arrest the worsening situation.
    ASIA/NEAR EAST: Almost five months after the tsunami, most of the displaced people are still depending on food aid, while recovery and reconstruction activities continue. In Korea DPR, millions of vulnerable people will cease receiving food assistance soon unless substantial food donations are received. The food supply situation in Mongolia remains precarious after another harsh winter in the wake of last summer's drought. Elsewhere in Asia, severe droughts have seriously affected crops in several countries, especially in Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, China, and Laos. In the Asian CIS countries and Afghanistan, prospects are for a good harvest this year, owing mainly to favourable weather conditions.

    LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN: The recent start of the rainy season, notwithstanding, Cuba and Haiti have been seriously affected by a prolonged dry period and production of main staple food crops is expected to decline. In Central America, food assistance continues to be provided to vulnerable communities in El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua mainly due to past disasters. In Brazil, the maize crop has been affected by drought, especially in the main producing southern states. In Ecuador, heavy rains at the end of April affected the 2005 winter paddy crop that was about to be harvested.

    EUROPE: A reduction in cereal production is forecast in the EU in 2005 after the bumper crop last year, reflecting an area reduction and lower yields than last year's high levels. However, while yields and outputs remain somewhat above average in most member countries, the outlook is poor in Spain and Portugal because of persisting drought. Some reduction in output is also in prospect in the Balkan countries, despite generally favourable conditions, because also in these parts, yields are not expected to match last year's exceptionally good levels. In the European CIS, spring cereal planting was delayed owing to unfavourable weather while winterkill was low given above average snowfall providing protective cover.

    NORTH AMERICA: Prospects remain generally favourable for the wheat crops at different stages of growth throughout the region. In the United States, wheat output is forecast to decrease marginally, and production of coarse grains is also expected to decline reflecting a return to normal yields after last year's records. In Canada, the bulk of the 2005 cereal crops have just been planted and an above-average output is expected, although not as good as that in 2004.

    OCEANIA: A below-average cereal output is expected in Australia in 2005 because of persisting drought in eastern parts of the country during what should have been the main planting period.

    (pdf* format - 636 KB)


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    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Haiti, Indonesia, Israel, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Rwanda, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Tajikistan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania

    This week 's report covers the following sectors/countries:
    Sectors: Agriculture, Food, Health, Protection / Human Rights / Rule of Law, Refugees and IDPs, Shelter and Non-food Items, Water & Sanitation

    This report includes:

    (A) Highlights

    (B) Middle East,Central Asia and Eastern Europe: (1) Afghanistan (2) Libyan Arab Jamahiriya (3) Occupied Palestinian Territories (4) Pakistan (5) Tajikistan

    (C) East & Central Africa: (1) Burundi (2) Congo, DR (3) Djibouti (4) Eritrea (5) Kenya (6) Rwanda (7) Somalia (8) Sudan (9) Tanzania (10) Uganda

    (D) West Africa: (1) Cote d'Ivoire (2) Guinea (3) Liberia (4) Mali (5) Mauritania (6) Niger

    (E) Southern Africa: (1) Angola (2) Lesotho (3) Malawi (4) Mozambique (5) Swaziland (6) Zambia (7) Zimbabwe

    (F) Asia: (1) Bangladesh (2) Indonesia (3) Korea (DPR) (4) Maldives (5) Sri Lanka

    (G) Latin America and Caribbean: (1) Regional (2) Bolivia (3) Colombia (4) Ecuador (5) El Salvador (6) Guatemala (7) Haiti (8) Nicaragua (9) Peru

    (A) Highlights

    (a) On the frontline of one of Niger's worst hunger crises, WFP plans to have provided food assistance to 273,400 beneficiaries by the end of this week.

    (b) Fuel shortage in El Obeid, Sudan slowed down food deliveries to Bahr El Ghazal, where WFP is seriously concerned about acute food shortages.

    (c) Emergency food distribution to flood affected population in Pakistan's North West Frontier Province (NWFP) started this week.

    (d) Findings of a WFP assessment in Mozambique's western Tete Province indicate a devastating combination of chronic poverty and a lack of food resources due to the failure of early rains in 2005.

    (pdf* format - 106KB)


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, India, Indonesia, Liberia, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Nepal, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Thailand, Uganda, Zimbabwe


    THE SECRETARY-GENERAL FOREWORD TO THE HUMANITARIAN APPEAL 2006
    The past year has been a wretched one for millions of disaster victims. It dawned with the Indian Ocean tsunami, saw a hurricane season unrivalled in living memory strike the Americas, and included South Asia’s devastating earthquake. Through it all, other tragic crises persisted in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. Like never before, the year stretched and tested the capabilities of aid agencies, and the will of survivors.

    This Humanitarian Appeal seeks $ 4.7 billion in urgent support for 31 million people worldwide. The Appeal covers 26 countries and comes to roughly $ 150 per person, a relatively small amount where lives hang in the balance.

    The Consolidated Appeals Process (CAP) is the international community’s most important tool for raising resources for humanitarian action. By bringing together relief agencies, the CAP avoids competing appeals, and provides a unified framework for a strategic and inclusive response. It is designed not only to alleviate immediate suffering, but also to identify and address longer-term needs. This year, for the first time, every Consolidated Appeal includes projects to be undertaken by non-governmental organizations as well as UN agency initiatives.

    United Nations Member States must necessarily take the lead in responding to the Appeal. But the private sector, and every concerned citizen, should contribute. The many high-profile disasters of the past year mobilized great numbers of individuals across the world. Their support brought food to the hungry, medical assistance to the sick and shelter to displaced populations. I hope that all such individuals remain engaged in humanitarian efforts and continue donating generously.

    I call on the international community to support this year’s Appeal, and to do so with a sense of urgency. Historically, only one-tenth of Consolidated Appeals have been funded in the first quarter of each year. Yet early funding enables aid agencies to start programs on schedule, ensuring timely and dependable assistance. As untended humanitarian crises inevitably worsen, delayed giving costs more in lives and in resources.

    To encourage early giving, UN Member States are being invited to Geneva on 10 January 2006. The gathering will be an opportunity for donors to lay out their priorities and funding goals for the year. It will also allow aid agencies to elaborate on pressing needs, and to seek immediately needed commitments.

    We must ensure that all people in crisis – regardless of nationality, gender or belief – receive adequate aid or support. Together, we can save lives and make a difference. It is in this spirit that I ask you to generously support Humanitarian Appeal 2006.

    Koffi A. Annan

    INTRODUCTION

    This year has been a year like no other for humanitarian action, bracketed by devastating disasters – the Indian Ocean tsunami in the final days of 2004 and the South Asia earthquake of October 2005, on top of the worst hurricane season in living memory – and stretching all humanitarian agencies to their maximum capacity and beyond. Funding, led by private donations for the tsunami, reached unprecedented worldwide totals – but because the majority of funds were earmarked for the tsunami, most agencies and non-governmental organisations (NGOs) still lacked sufficient funding to assist millions of people struck by other crises. Victims of conflict saw improvements in some regions, while other conflicts intensified, worsening the human cost. Angola, emerging from a war that stretched back to the 1970s, had its first year since 1993 without a consolidated appeal. Formerly warring parties in Sudan signed a peace accord and entered a period of reconciliation, return and reintegration of refugees and displaced people, and recovery – while a separate conflict in Sudan’s Darfur region deteriorated again and continues to be one of the world’s most serious crises. Effects of the insurgency in Nepal worsened, leading to that country’s first consolidated appeal. In the midst of this year, a broad-ranging review of humanitarian action laid down blueprints for improved coordination and response. Humanitarian action continues to become more effective, professional, and efficient. The rationale for consolidated appeals remains straightforward and relevant: to avoid competing and overlapping appeals, and to provide a framework for strategic, coordinated, and inclusive programming. All Consolidated Appeals comprise strategic action plans and specific project proposals by both NGOs and UN agencies.

    For 2006, 18 programmes require a total of $ 4.7 billion to ensure that 31 million people in 26 countries get the best available protection and assistance, on time. In addition to new requirements for 2006, some $ 766 million is still required for five flash appeals issued in 2005 and which extend into the coming year.

    This may seem like a lot of money – but in fact, it’s the same as asking each person in the world’s wealthy countries to donate the cost of two cups of coffee.


    EXAMPLES OF KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN 2005

    What are consolidated appeals, and what is done with the funding that agencies in them receive? In essence appeals are a snapshot of the aid community’s efforts to work together on context analysis, needs assessment, prioritisation, planning and coordinated programme implementation. The examples highlighted below illustrate the variety of specialised actions that comprise the Consolidated Appeals Process’ strategic

    Burundi (48% funded)

    Food aid (78% funded): Distribution of 45,800 metric tonnes (MT) of food throughout the country, reaching 1.3 million people (12,500 MTs to vulnerable households through targeted distributions, 3,000 MTs allocated to the 220 nutritional centres in Burundi, 6,000 MTs to people living with HIV/AIDS and other vulnerable groups in social centres, 1,000 MTs to refugee families, and 2,000 MTs to Burundian returning refugees from Tanzania and Rwanda); more than 21,300 MTs also distributed through recovery activities, such as the seed-protection ration programme, food-for-work/training activities, Disarmament-Demobilisation-Reintegration (DDR), and school feeding.

    Agriculture (57% funded): Distribution of seeds and agricultural tools to 625,000 households; expanded recovery activities targeting specific vulnerabilities of approximately 40,000 households with reduced land access, Batwa minority communities, internally displaced persons (IDPs), and the chronically ill; distribution of 26,800,000 sweet potato cuttings and plants for improved crop and seed multiplication in regions affected by drought and crop pest; support to IDP and refugee reinsertion including distribution of 210,000 fruit plants and recovery of 400 hectares of swamps, benefiting 42,000 households.

    Health (12% funded): Distribution of 378 essential drug kits, covering an estimated 567,000 consultations; 150 health emergency kits, covering an estimated 1,500,000 patients; 1,250 trauma kits and 2,500 replenishment kits; 900 basic surgery kits; 40 midwife drugs and equipment kits and 10 obstetrical surgery kits. Training and supervision: refresher training for 395 nurses and 77 health centre managers; availability of staff management and supervision tools at 178 centres, drug stock management at 185 centres and health centre audit at 107 centres. Number of HIV/AIDS test and treatment centres expanded from 89 in 2002 to 115 in 2004; rise in the number of tested people from 30,412 in 2002 to 71,730 in 2004.

    Multi-sector (21% funded): Over 60,000 refugees repatriated to Burundi from Tanzania, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR); number of IDPs living in sites for the displaced has decreased from 145,000 in 170 sites in 2004 to 117,000 in 160 sites countrywide in 2005.

    Central African Republic (31% funded)

    Health & nutrition (22% funded): Halt of transmission of wild polio virus; national immunisation campaigns against measles carried out to protect children 6 months to 14 years of age.

    HIV/AIDS (39% funded): Services for Prevention of Parent-Child Transmission and the Counsel for Voluntary Testing made operational in Bangui and in the former conflict zones, with the opening of five new testing centres.

    Water and sanitation (33% funded): Rehabilitation of 324 pumps in Nana Grébizi and Ouham, with re-activation of community water point committees; provision of hygiene materials to schools; training of teachers and student-parent associations.

    Education (1% funded): Distribution of 5,000 new school desks as partial replacement for the 55,000 destroyed in the conflict in 2002–2003 (bringing the total replaced to 10,300); distribution of pedagogic material in the form of school kits for about 154,000 students and 2,500 teachers in the former conflict zones; rehabilitation of 11 school buildings, giving educational access to more than 2,500 students in these zones.

    Protection (0% funded): 800 victims of rape and sexual violence received psycho-social support and aid for income-generating activities.

    Food aid & food security (31% funded): 469 tonnes of food provided under the World Food Programme’s (WFP) food-for-work and food-for-training programmes for 2,359 households; 56 training sessions performed on themes of hygiene and prevention of HIV for 80,000 beneficiaries; 102,000 displaced or returning persons received food to facilitate their return to zone of origin; 27,737 vulnerable people (including 5,548 people with AIDS and their family members) received food aid; 5,494 orphans and seniors received food aid.

    Flood assistance: Provision of 75,000 litres of water per day for 60 days; distribution of 10,000 jerry cans; sanitary education; pre-positioning of medical supplies to ensure urgent care for 10,000 people for three months, with distribution of anti-malarials for 1,000 people; provision of food (therapeutic biscuits "BP5") and kerosene lamps.

    Demobilisation and reintegration: 5,447 ex-combatants registered, with 894 disarmed and demobilised (including 282 women); 692 ex-combatants reintegrated into communities.

    Multi-sectoral assistance to refugees (100% funded): Repatriation of 1,374 Chadian refugees and 3,000 Democratic Republic of the Congo refugees.

    Chad (54% funded)

    Coordination and support services (18% funded): Sector working groups in place in Abéché and specific groups discussing assistance to Chadian host communities; working groups set up in N’Djaména.

    Education (28% funded): School classrooms built in 10 of the 12 camps, and tents and other structures put in place in the remaining camps; teachers in all camps received training; schoolbooks and materials provided to all schools; 40 pre-school teachers trained in each camp; enrolment of over 46,000 students at primary level alone; summer school activities organised in each camp.

    Environment: System of organised collection of firewood put in place in several camps in the east; Introduction of fuel-efficient stoves.

    Food (52% funded): Provision of food to 193,300 refugees in eastern Chad; food-for-work activities supporting local populations (4,800 households and a seed protection programme supporting another 4,000 families).

    Health (31% funded): Set-up of an early warning system for 193,300 refugees and 700,000 Chadians; set-up of a nutritional surveillance system for 193,300 refugees; meningitis mass immunisation campaigns for both refugees and local population – 58,139 people vaccinated; better health coordination in place.

    Multi-sector (79% funded): Protection and assistance to some 200,000 refugees in the east; Implementation of small-scale Quick Impact Projects (QIPs) for host communities in the east.

    Water and Sanitation (9% funded): Assistance to some 200,000 refugees in eastern Chad with the provision of safe water (12.6 litres/person/day) and sanitation (average: 33 persons/latrine); assisted some 55,000 members of host communities through emergency hepatitis-E response.

    Côte d'Ivoire (41% funded)

    Food (100% funded): Food and nutritional assistance provided to 700,675 recipients including vulnerable farmers during the lean season, IDPs in reception camps, returnees, refugees, women, and children in nutrition centres and HIV patients; nearly 540,000 primary school children received food rations under the emergency school feeding programme (helping to keep children in schools, especially in areas under the control of the Forces Nouvelles).

    Agriculture (56% funded): 150,000 people in the north, centre and west received seeds, fertilisers, and hand tools.

    Water and sanitation (5% funded): Supplying chemical treatment products to the water supply company so that more than 1.5 million people have access to safe water.

    Refugee care (72% funded): By the end of 2005, an estimated 16,000 of the 36,000 refugees will have voluntarily returned to Liberia; 6,500 Liberian refugees were resettled in the United States.

    Health (6% funded): Essential drugs and materials were delivered to most functional health facilities (497 out of the existing 578); 158 of these health facilities have been rehabilitated and are waiting for qualified personnel to improve the population's access to basic care; organisation of national immunisation days throughout the country, with 99.9% of children between 0–5 years old vaccinated against poliomyelitis and 87.7% (i.e. 7.8 million children) between 9 months and 14 years old vaccinated against measles; response to meningitis epidemic in Bouna (19% mortality rate) where 55,214 out of 209,500 were vaccinated.

    Education (13% funded): Shortfall of accredited teachers (a total of 3,262) was partially made up by 2,891 voluntary teachers; supply of school and teaching materials to a few schools.

    Protection & rule of law (3% funded): Effective proximity communication and promotion of peace (ONUCI FM radio programmes, consultations with local humanitarian agencies, elected officers and community leaders).

    Great Lakes Region (77% funded)

    Coordination and liaison (71% funded): Inter-agency working groups; inter-agency collaboration; internal coordination; joint assessments and planning.

    Advocacy: Advocating for life saving assistance; advocacy on behalf of refugees, returnees, IDPs and host communities. Thematic advocacy issues: HIV/AIDS, sexual and gender based violence, violations of children's rights.

    Emergency response capacity and direct assistance: Direct assistance – WFP's regional PRRO continued to provide assistance to refugees and other vulnerable populations in the region with beneficiary numbers in the last quarter of 2005 in the region of 1.8 million people. Food and Agriculture Organization's (FAO) regional HIV/AIDS mitigation project is ongoing with activities in Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Uganda. UNHCR also continued to provide assistance for refugees and returnees throughout the region. The agency provided non-food items, education opportunities, and, where possible, facilitated resettlement of refugees from particularly insecure environments. Other assistance: Surge capacity and backstopping; technical support; resource mobilisation; training (support to the development of response plans).

    Emergency preparedness, monitoring, and evaluation: Emergency preparedness; early warning;

    Guinea (51% funded)

    Protection (37% funded): 60 separated refugee children reunited with their families in Sierra Leone; voluntary repatriation of 18,000 Liberian refugees; remaining caseload of 2,060 Sierra Leonean refugees in Boreah camp continued to receive relief assistance and protection in preparation for their local integration.

    Health (18% funded): Yellow fever control and poliomyelitis immunisation carried out as the second round of the polio vaccination campaign launched in April 2005, reaching a global coverage of 111%; efforts made to lower malnutrition, morbidity, and mortality rates through targeted programmes in water and sanitation, nutrition, and mother and child health care; eight-month supply of essential drugs provided to 36 health centres in Beyla, Lola, N'Zerekore, and Yomou prefectures in the last quarter of 2005; support for disease surveillance among the refugees and host communities.

    Water and sanitation (0% funded): Macenta and N'Zerekore prefectures benefited from the establishment of 500 latrines; 1,255 water pumps were made operational during 2005, benefiting approximately 610,000 persons; 20 water points constructed in Guinea Forestière.

    Food aid and agriculture (64% funded): Food aid continued to be provided to moderately and severely malnourished children, their mothers, and HIV/AIDS victims; provision of agricultural inputs and technical assistance in Guinea Forestière to improve coping mechanisms and food security among 10,000 returnee households from Côte d'Ivoire, Sierra Leonean refugees, and host communities; school vegetable gardens received seeds and tools to increase self-reliance of school feeding programmes; income-generating projects helped a total of 20,000 IDPs, returnees, and host communities to increase their food security and coping mechanisms. (In spite of carefully planned emergency agriculture response, food security has not improved.)

    Education (0% funded): Host families constructed additional classrooms using local material to reduce the average class size down from 124 pupils.

    occupied Palestinian territory (59% funded)

    Response to specific acute crisis areas and vulnerabilities has been achieved in particular in health with the coverage of basic needs (immunisation, control of communicable diseases) and delivery of services. In psychosocial support, only two objectives were fulfilled: setting up an emergency preparedness and response system and setting up child friendly spaces in emergency situations. In education, services to the 16–18 year old target group have been neglected due to lack of attention and funding. Regular food assistance has contributed to supporting the most food insecure sector of the non-refugee population, reducing further impoverishment and the tendency to resort to negative coping mechanisms. The effect of pursuing the CAP goals and priorities has been, as expected, the reduction of poverty, the possibility given to the beneficiaries to restart their activities, improved availability and access to fresh produce, and an improvement of their diet.

    Mitigation of negative effects of fragmentation in health through mobile clinics and in psychosocial support through twelve mobile teams providing support to 25,000 children and 15,000 care givers. In addition, 29 "safe play" areas have now been set up reaching 90,000 children and adolescents. Programmes including support to employment and cash assistance have contributed to maintaining economic and infrastructure activities. Some programmes, when completed, will have generated a total of approximately 25,000 workdays and others contributed to the creation of over one million workdays through direct and indirect hire. Cash assistance was particularly appropriate for those families (around 11,000 vulnerable families, i.e. 82,000 people) unable to sustain participation in even short-term employment programmes.

    Awareness and advocacy on protection issues particularly proactive in health, especially mental health. In psychosocial support, a need is felt to advocate for most vulnerable groups, such as examining the impact of closures, conflict and the barrier on women's physical and mental health, and the difficulties women face in accessing health, agricultural land, education, and workplace; to improve targeting the emergency needs of acute crisis areas. Coordination efforts led to disseminating further information of facts on the ground and serving various planning and decision-making processes.

    To improve sector coordination, indicators, monitoring, and surveillance systems in health and to build on targeting psycho-social support to children to reach other vulnerable groups.

    Building partnerships: Gender is being mainstreamed with local partners and sex-disaggregated data are routinely collected.

    Republic of Congo (50% funded)

    Health (1% funded): Support for surveillance of acute flaccid paralysis for polio eradication; support for sero-surveillance of HIV; support to Kinkala HIV monitoring post and laboratory for reference hospital; launch of project for community distribution of Ivermectin (anti-parasitic); launch of programme against Buruli ulcer.

    Water and sanitation (87% funded): Provision for all targeted school, health centres and markets of wells with handpumps and san-plat latrines; installation of mini-rain-catchment systems in several target localities; promotion of improved water points and establishment of community water point management committees; training of water point maintenance workers.

    Food security (64% funded): Support for rehabilitation of socio-economic infrastructures (schools, health centres, agricultural roads) and re-launch of agricultural activities through food-for-work; school canteens in primary and preschools; nutritional treatment for HIV/AIDS patients; medical follow-up through ambulatory treatment centres; support to DDR through income-generating activities.

    Agriculture: No funding.

    Protection (100% funded): Psychosocial treatment of affected people; consultation and treatment of post-conflict trauma for 200 children and women in Mindouli; promotion of birth registration; 4,111 children retroactively registered; dissemination of principles on protection of displaced people and refugees for civil society, governmental and non-governmental partners; reintegration of child soldiers (limited by insecurity in the Pool region); promotion for social reintegration of young mothers; registration of 58,000 foreign refugees in the Congo.

    Education (13% funded): Order of school kits, crayons and school bags for 15,000 pupils; training of teachers; rehabilitation of school buildings.

    Economic recovery: No funding.

    Shelter & NFI: No funding.

    Somalia (46% funded)

    Multi-sector refugee care (76% funded): In 2005, 6,866 Somali refugees returned to Somalia with UNHCR assistance, bringing the total number of returnees since the early 1990s to some 1.2 million (majority returned spontaneously; nearly 500,000 assisted by UNHCR).

    HIV/AIDS: Somaliland AIDS Commission launched; HIV test kits for Voluntary Confidential Counselling Testing services distributed in hospitals; health workers trained on voluntary counselling and testing; peer education initiatives begun in primary and secondary schools in Somaliland; 50 patients commenced antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Somaliland and capacity building to scale up is underway.

    Food security and livelihoods (56% funded): Assistance in rebuilding the fisheries sector in tsunami-affected communities, and to drought-stricken pastoralist communities in Sool and Sanag plateau; support to riverine communities affected by floods in Juba Valley; nearly 1.2 million people benefited from food aid distributions in 2005 targeting schools attended by children from returnees, IDPs, and other vulnerable communities, allowing 9,050 underprivileged children to go to school.

    Health (25% funded): 15,000 children vaccinated through the Expanded Programme on Immunisation (EPI) accelerated multi-antigen campaign; provided mobile clinic services that benefited 14,000 people in drought-affected Sool/Sanaag (Bari, Nugal, and Togdeer regions); supported nine supplementary feeding programmes and established four therapeutic feeding centres to treat 11,000 malnourished children in south and central zones; outbreak preparedness and response plans put in place including pre-positioning of supplies in all three zones; epidemiological weekly surveillance system refined and improved; 22 participants in all three zones trained on three-month course on community-based mental health services.

    Water and sanitation (53% funded): Improved access to safe drinking water provided to approximately 120,000 people throughout the country; 500 latrine slabs provided to marginalised communities in south and central zones; hygiene awareness campaigns launched in Bossaso IDP camps and capacity building of community water and sanitation committees through training of committee members in three targeted locations.

    Education (34% funded): Increased primary school enrolment by 63,000 children; construction of four classroom blocks complete with water and sanitation facilities in Somaliland and Puntland; construction of seven school buildings in the tsunami-hit area of Hafun; provision of 186 tents to serve as temporary classrooms for 15,000 pupils; training of 1,500 primary school teachers and support for the increasing involvement of Somali women in local NGOs assisting with education programme delivery.

    Protection (18% funded): IDP working groups in Somaliland and Puntland established that provided guidance on provision of accelerated humanitarian assistance and implementation of longer-term approaches to IDP resettlement; working groups developed strategic plans and are addressing the issue of resettlement with host communities in Garowe, Hargeisa, and Jowhar; Joint Strategic Framework on IDPs finalised and will become an "implementation tool" for other longer-term development initiatives.

    Uganda (65% funded)

    Agriculture (51% funded): Over 90% of IDP and resettling households with access to land (220,000 households) received agricultural inputs for at least one acre of land.

    Education (34% funded): Establishment of 123 community-based Early Childhood Development (ECD) centres in IDP camps in Gulu, Kitgum, Lira, and Pader districts, catering for approximately 20,730 children (1–8 years old); installation of water facilities (boreholes and water tanks) and 545 mobilets in 51 learning centres in Gulu, Katakwi and Pader, targeting about 25,000 children (51% girls), and the expansion of the Girls' Education Movement (GEM) to 61 schools in the learning centres of Apac, Kitgum, Lira, and Pader; 1,856 teachers and tutors in Gulu, Kaberamaido, Katakwi, Kitgum, and Lira trained in integrated psychosocial education.

    Shelter and non-food items (95% funded): Approximately 90% of IDPs have received a standard general household item distribution within the last 18 months.

    Food aid (66% funded): Planned Beneficiaries Actual Beneficiaries (January-June 2005)

    General food distribution
    2,150,000

    1,879,986
    Supplementary feeding
    121,457
    34,636
    Therapeutic feeding
    22,500
    14,121
    Food-for-Assets (FFA)
    167,718
    51,534
    HIV/AIDS
    80,450
    70,648
    School feeding
    410,287
    385,889
    Total
    2,952,412
    2,436,819

    Health and nutrition (30% funded): In Karamoja sub-region and Gulu, Kitgum, and Pader districts, Global Acute Malnutrition Rate (GAM) stands at 18.7% for Karamoja, between 6.2–10.2% for Gulu, 11.8–15% for Kitgum, and 5–10% for Pader; figures reflect general improvement in population's nutritional status, attributed to increased access to humanitarian assistance and farmland. Key studies and surveys were completed improving the understanding of the HIV/AIDS situation in the north. Rollout of ART started in many districts in the north, although coverage remains limited. Programmes that target food distribution and nutritional support to people starting ART have also begun.

    Human rights, protection and rule of law (65% funded): Increased deployment of paralegals with consequently more systematic documentation of human rights violations in IDP camps in Gulu, Katakwi, Kitgum, Lira, Pader, and Soroti; 30 community protection committees in IDP camps in Lira and Teso promoted over 100 community campaigns against SGBV; over 100 UPDF officers trained in their responsibilities in relation to the protection of children and women; community-based child protection mechanisms were formed in 10 IDP camps in Apac, Gulu, Lira, and Soroti.

    Mine action (16% funded): First group of 20 UPDF engineers out of 140 engineers planned until 2007 undergo UK-funded humanitarian de-mining training and equipment programme; coordination mechanism for mine action has been established by the OPM.

    Multi-sector (75% funded): 230,262 registered refugees continued to receive assistance and protection in Adjumani, Arua, Moyo, and Yumbe districts.

    Water and sanitation (38% funded): Change from manual single point water systems (springs and hand pumps) to motorised (diesel or solar) water supply systems has begun; by the end of 2005 more than 45 systems will be completed.

    West Africa Region (65% funded)

    Agriculture (20% funded): Emergency provision of agricultural inputs for food crop production in areas of the Sahel most severely affected by drought and locusts; community-level involvement in desert locust control.

    Food (77% funded): Food aid provided to 4,942,600 recipients

    Table of Contents

    FOREWORD TO THE HUMANITARIAN APPEAL 2006

    INTRODUCTION

    EXAMPLES OF KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN 2005

    SOME IMPROVEMENTS AND REMAINING CHALLENGES

    - Humanitarian reform
    - Linking relief and development: Millennium Development Goals
    - Accountability and transparency
    - Gains in programme coherence
    - NGO participation in appeals: significant progress
    - Flash appeals
    - Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF)

    HUMANITARIAN FUNDING IN 2005

    - Expanding the governmental donor base
    - Private funding: how to keep the momentum beyond the tsunami?
    - Funding per sector
    - Timing
    - Humanitarian funding inside vs. outside consolidated and flash appeals

    CONCLUSION

    CONSOLIDATED APPEALS

    BURUNDI
    CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC
    CHAD
    CÔTE D'IVOIRE
    GREAT LAKES REGION
    GUINEA
    LIBERIA
    NEPAL
    OCCUPIED PALESTINIAN TERRITORY
    REPUBLIC OF CONGO
    SOMALIA
    UGANDA
    WEST AFRICA
    ZIMBABWE

    OTHER COUNTRY PLANS

    COLOMBIA
    CHECHNYA (RUSSIAN FEDERATION)
    DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO
    SUDAN

    FLASH APPEALS

    GUATEMALA
    INDIAN OCEAN EARTHQUAKE - TSUNAMI
    MALAWI
    SOUTH ASIA EARTHQUAKE
    WEST AND CENTRAL AFRICA CHOLERA FLASH APPEAL

    ANNEX

    2005 CONSOLIDATED & FLASH APPEALS: SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS AND CONTRIBUTIONS
    2006 APPEALS: SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS

    Note: The full text of this appeal is available on-line in Adobe Acrobat (pdf) format and may also be downloaded in zipped MS Word format.

    Full Original Review [pdf* format][zipped MS Word format]

    * Get the Adobe Acrobat Viewer (free)

    For additional copies, please contact:

    UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Palais des Nations
    8-14 Avenue de la Paix
    CH - 1211 Geneva, Switzerland

    Tel.: (41 22) 917.1972
    Fax: (41 22) 917.0368
    E-Mail: cap@reliefweb.int


    0 0

    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, India, Indonesia, Liberia, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Thailand, Uganda, Zimbabwe

    (New York: 30 November 2005): United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan today called for $4.7 billion to provide urgent support to 31 million people in humanitarian emergencies in 26 countries worldwide.
    "The past year has demonstrated our tremendous capacity for giving," said the Secretary-General. "This Humanitarian Appeal is an opportunity, which must not be missed, to extend that generosity to people whose plight may not capture the world's attention, but whose suffering is no less tragic. In a world of plenty, continued suffering is a terrible stain on our conscience. It is inexcusable that we not strive, with every resource at our disposal, to eliminate suffering," he added.

    The "Humanitarian Appeal 2006" comprises individual Consolidated Appeals for Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Cote d'Ivoire, Guinea, Liberia, occupied Palestinian territory, Republic of Congo, Somalia, Uganda, Zimbabwe, the Great Lakes region and the West African region. Funding requirements for major ongoing emergencies such as those in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Sudan are also included.

    "Unfortunately, many of these disasters have been largely forgotten by the international community," said Jan Egeland, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator. "We can no longer afford to neglect the majority of crises -- to play a humanitarian lottery in which only one or two crises capture the world's attention each year, and therefore its support," he added, stressing that "the funding of humanitarian assistance must be more predictable and more equitable."

    "We need to see an expansion of the humanitarian donor community," said Mr. Egeland. "For too long we have relied upon the same donors to fund the vast majority of our humanitarian assistance efforts. In 2005, nineteen new donors made contributions to the United Nations appeals; at least nineteen additional new donors should contribute in 2006."

    The United Nations launches the Humanitarian Appeal for the forthcoming calendar year each November. The Humanitarian Appeal is composed of all the Consolidated Appeals developed in individual countries or regions through a consultative process that includes the United Nations operational agencies and participating non-governmental organizations (NGOs).

    To find out more and have your say, visit www.humanitarianappeal.net.

    For further information, please call: Stephanie Bunker, OCHA-New York, +1 917 367 5126, mobile +1 917 892 1679; Kristen Knutson, OCHA-New York, +1 917 367 9262; Elizabeth Byrs, OCHA-Geneva, +41 22 917 2653, mobile +41 79 473 4570.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Indonesia, Kenya, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Nepal, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Russian Federation, Somalia, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe


    Consolidated Appeals Process (CAP)
    The CAP is much more than an appeal for money. It is an inclusive and coordinated programme cycle of:

    (a) strategic planning leading to a Common Humanitarian Action Plan (CHAP);

    (b) resource mobilisation (leading to a Consolidated Appeal or a Flash Appeal);

    (c) coordinated programme implementation;

    (d) joint monitoring and evaluation;

    (e) revision, if necessary; and

    (f) reporting on results.

    The CHAP is a strategic plan for humanitarian response in a given country or region and includes the following elements:

    (a) a common analysis of the context in which humanitarian action takes place;

    (b) an assessment of needs;

    (c) best, worst, and most likely scenarios;

    (d) stakeholder analysis, i.e. who does what and where;

    (e) a clear statement of longer-term objectives and goals;

    (f) prioritised response plans; and

    (g) a framework for monitoring the strategy and revising it if necessary.

    The CHAP is the foundation for developing a Consolidated Appeal or, when crises break or natural disasters strike, a Flash Appeal. Under the leadership of the Humanitarian Coordinator, the CHAP is developed at the field level by the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Country Team. This team mirrors the IASC structure at headquarters and includes UN agencies and standing invitees, i.e. the International Organization for Migration, the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, and NGOs that belong to ICVA, Interaction, or SCHR. Non-IASC members, such as national NGOs, can be included, and other key stakeholders in humanitarian action, in particular host governments and donors, should be consulted.

    The Humanitarian Coordinator is responsible for the annual preparation of the consolidated appeal document. The document is launched globally each November to enhance advocacy and resource mobilisation. An update, known as the Mid-Year Review, is to be presented to donors in July 2006.

    Donors provide resources to appealing agencies directly in response to project proposals. The Financial Tracking Service (FTS), managed by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), is a database of donor contributions and can be found on www.reliefweb.int/fts

    In sum, the CAP works to provide people in need the best available protection and assistance, on time.

    INTRODUCTION

    Seventeen consolidated appeals and two flash appeals in 2006 bring together key organisations on the ground – non-governmental organisations, the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, the United Nations, and other international organisations – to present strategic action plans and detailed project proposals for the world’s largest and most acute humanitarian crises. Their aim is to provide people in need the best available protection and assistance, on time.

    Much has been achieved in the face of these crises in the first half of 2006. Much more remains to be done. Funding for these appeals overall stands at 36% of requirements (US$1.7 billion funded against requirements of $4.8 billion ). In this Mid-year Review, teams in these crisis-affected countries offer updates of the contexts and causes of humanitarian need, amend their strategic response plans and specific projects as needed, and summarise achievements to date.

    In the midst of a major new round of humanitarian reforms, the basic rationale of the consolidated appeal process – part of the humanitarian reforms of 14 years ago – remains relevant: to overcome the prolific structure of the humanitarian system’s implementation side by bringing organisations together into a common analysis, strategy and action plan; and to combine what would be overlapping, competing single-agency appeals into a comprehensive compendium of priority projects that avoids gaps and serves as a meaningful funding barometer for each crisis.



    Table of Contents

    INTRODUCTION

    EXAMPLES OF KEY ACCOMPLISHMENTS IN 2006

    HUMANITARIAN REFORM IN 2006

    • How the cluster leadership approach fills gaps and strengthens sector coordination
    • Strengthening the Humanitarian Coordinator System: individuals who can deliver effective leadership in humanitarian emergencies
    • Faster and more equitable funding: the Central Emergency Response Fund

    THE CONSOLIDATED APPEAL PROCESS AND THE HUMANITARIAN REFORM

    FLASH APPEALS: LESSONS LEARNED

    NEEDS ANALYSIS AND STRATEGIC MONITORING

    NGOS AND THE RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT MOVEMENT IN APPEALS

    FUNDING AT MID-2006

    • Funding in proportion to donor GDP
    • Funding per beneficiary
    • Funding per sector
    • Funding ‘inside’ and ‘outside’ the CAP

    BURUNDI
    CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC
    CHAD
    CÔTE D'IVOIRE
    DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO
    GREAT LAKES REGION
    GUINEA
    HORN OF AFRICA
    LIBERIA
    NEPAL
    OCCUPIED PALESTINIAN TERRITORY
    REPUBLIC OF CONGO
    SOMALIA
    SUDAN
    UGANDA
    WEST AFRICA
    ZIMBABWE
    TIMOR-LESTE FLASH APPEAL
    GUINEA-BISSAU FLASH APPEAL
    ETHIOPIA
    INDONESIA EARTHQUAKE RESPONSE PLAN
    NORTH CAUCASUS (RUSSIAN FEDERATION) TRANSITIONAL WORKPLAN

    APPEAL FOR IMPROVING HUMANITARIAN RESPONSE CAPACITY: CLUSTER 2006

    ANNEX I.

    • ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

    ANNEX II.
    • 2006 CONSOLIDATED & FLASH APPEALS: SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS AND FUNDING PER SECTOR

    ANNEX III.
    • 2006 CONSOLIDATED & FLASH APPEALS: SUMMARY OF REQUIREMENTS AND FUNDING PER APPEAL

    Note: The full text of this appeal is available on-line in Adobe Acrobat (pdf) format and may also be downloaded in zipped MS Word format.

    Full Original Mid-Term Review [pdf* format][zipped MS Word format]

    * Get the Adobe Acrobat Viewer (free)

    For additional copies, please contact:

    UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Palais des Nations
    8-14 Avenue de la Paix
    CH - 1211 Geneva, Switzerland

    Tel.: (41 22) 917.1972
    Fax: (41 22) 917.0368
    E-Mail: cap@reliefweb.int


    0 0

    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Indonesia, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Timor-Leste, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zimbabwe, India, Pakistan, Iraq, Haiti, Russian Federation

    HIGHLIGHTS CONTENTS

    - The FAO's latest assessment shows that 40 countries are facing food emergencies and require external assistance. Among them, the most pressing humanitarian problem remains the crisis in the Darfur region of Sudan. The already precarious food supply situation may worsen if deteriorating security disrupts the main harvest due to start in the coming few weeks.

    - Prospects for the 2006 world cereal harvest have deteriorated further since July. Exceptionally hot and dry weather is adversely affecting the wheat crops in Australia, Argentina and Brazil, while drier-than-normal weather in parts of South Asia is also raising some concern for the second 2006 paddy crop.

    - Latest information confirms a tighter world cereal balance in 2006/07. Compared to earlier expectations, global cereal output is seen to be smaller, and to meet the anticipated utilization in 2006/07, world closing stocks are forecast to be lower. As a result, international prices of most cereals have increased sharply so far this year.

    - Low supplies call for a closer monitoring of world food situation. Despite good crops in many of the Low-Income Food-Deficit Countries, this year's anticipated sharp fall in global stocks may lead to a more precarious situation next season should weather problems prevent an increase in world cereal production in 2007.

    - The early outlook for the northern hemisphere's main winter cereal crops for harvest in 2007 is generally favourable so far. Planting is reported to be proceeding well in Europe, and in the United States, where a large expansion in wheat area is expected.

    (pdf* format - 822 KB)


    0 0

    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Indonesia, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Mauritania, Nepal, Niger, Pakistan, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Timor-Leste, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zimbabwe, Iraq, Haiti, Russian Federation

    HIGHLIGHTS

    The global cereal supply and demand situation has further tightened, with a downward revision of the 2006 world cereal production forecast and a projected increase in cereal utilization in 2006/07. At current forecast levels, the utilization would exceed production by 3.3 percent in 2006/07. World cereal stocks are forecast to decline for the third consecutive year, with those of wheat falling to their lowest level since 1981.

    Cereal export prices have increased sharply in recent months, mainly in response to tightening world supplies and by November 2006 were well above their levels of a year earlier. Because of higher prices, the cereal import bill of the Low-Income Food-Deficit Countries (LIFDCs) is forecast to increase by 15 percent in 2006/07.

    However, higher prices are also encouraging larger plantings of 2007 crops. Wheat planting has been completed in the main producing regions and early prospects are favourable, with increased areas reported and satisfactory weather conditions so far.

    Severe floods in the Horn of Africa in the past weeks have adversely affected up to 1.8 million people in Kenya, Ethiopia and, in particular, Somalia. Hundreds of thousands of people are urgently in need of humanitarian assistance. Despite the flooding, overall prospects for the 2006 cereal crops, now being harvested, in Eastern Africa remain favourable.

    In the developing countries, the 2006 cereal production has increased, or is projected to increase in almost all regions of the world, in particular Africa and Asia. As a result of the improved supplies in Africa, per caput cereal consumption is expected to rise in the 2006/07 marketing year.

    Following bumper harvests and ample cereal supplies in countries of Western and Southern Africa, and in order to support domestic prices, donors are encouraged to undertake local purchases and triangular transactions for their on-going food aid distribution programmes.

    (pdf* format - 897 KB)


    0 0

    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Country: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mauritania, Niger, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, United Republic of Tanzania, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Afghanistan, Azerbaijan, Iraq, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Timor-Leste, Haiti

    HIGHLIGHTS

    Favourable prospects for 2007 world cereal crops, mainly following expansion of plantings in Europe and North America, coupled with generally satisfactory weather conditions.

    FAO's latest estimates put global cereal output in 2006 at just under 2 billion tonnes, 2.7 percent lower than in the previous year but still above average. In percentage terms production of wheat declined the most, then coarse grains, while the reduction for rice is seen to be marginal.

    The bulk of the decline in the 2006 world cereal output was among the major producing and exporting countries.

    The 2006 cereal production in the group of LIFDCs increased significantly, with record or good crops in most regions of the world. As a result, cereal import requirements, including food aid, have declined in 2006/07 in many of these countries, mostly in Africa.

    Record or above-average 2006 cereal crops have been gathered in North, Western, Central, Eastern and most countries of Southern Africa, as well as in Far East Asia and the Asian CIS. Local purchases of cereals are recommended for food aid programmes in order to support prices.

    Despite the overall favourable food supply outlook for 2007, food security problems persist in several countries due to localized crop losses and or civil conflict.


    0 0

    Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
    Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Pakistan, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Timor-Leste, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    HIGHLIGHTS

    World cereal production in 2007 remains on course to reach a record level of 2 095 million tonnes, but with some major crops yet to be planted, the forecast is still tentative.

    Based on the current 2007 production outlook, global cereal supplies are forecast to increase in the new 2007/08 marketing season. However, with carryover stocks at their lowest level since the early 80s, total supplies would still be barely adequate to meet the anticipated demand, which is forecast to increase strongly boosted by the fast-growing biofuels industry.

    International prices for most cereals have risen signi?cantly in 2006/07 so far, and are likely to remain high in 2007/08. As a result, the cereal import bill of the LIFDCs is forecast to increase by about onequarter in the current season.

    In the LIFDCs as a group, production prospects point to a 2007 cereal output similar to last year's good level. However, excluding China and India, the largest producers, the aggregate crop of the remaining countries is forecast to decline slightly.

    In North Africa, a sharp decline is expected in 2007 aggregate cereal production, mainly re?ecting dry conditions in Morocco, which are anticipated to halve the country's wheat production this year.

    In Southern Africa, an aggregate reduced cereal harvest is being gathered for the second year in succession. In drought-affected Zimbabwe, a huge rise in the price of the basic staple maize is anticipated. By contrast, in Malawi, an ample exportable surplus is available following a bumper harvest.

    Despite improved food supply in many of the countries normally most at risk from food insecurity, following record or bumper 2006 cereal crops, food dif?culties persist in 33 countries worldwide.


    0 0

    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Chad, Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, occupied Palestinian territory, Somalia, Sudan, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Indonesia, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Timor-Leste, Algeria, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Liberia, Mauritania, Sierra Leone, Congo, Uganda, Colombia, Haiti, Bolivia (Plurinational State of)

    High Profile Operations

    Many high profile operations also face critical pipeline breaks in the next three months.

    Afghanistan

    PRRO 10427.0 - Post Conflict Relief and Rehabilitation

    January 06 - December 08

    Shortfalls over next 6 months (mt)(1)

    Cereals
    Pulses
    Blended Food
    Oil
    Other
    27,910
    1,237
    507
    0
    0
    Sep-07
    Nov-07
    Nov-07
    n/a
    n/a

    Resourcing US$

    Beneficiary Needs
    Total Mobilised
    Shortfall
    Shortfall %
    Tot. Project
    377,565,149
    202,614,342
    174,950,807
    46%
    2007
    168,265,102
    64,567,669
    103,697,433
    62%

    The combination of two decades of war, civil unrest and recurring natural disasters in one of the world's poorest countries requires WFP's presence in Afghanistan through a PRRO and a Special Operation.

    Severe weather conditions, like the recent rains and flash floods, cause major challenges for WFP and other UN agencies in delivering humanitarian relief to needy populations. Heavy rain has destroyed infrastructures and is blocking roads and restricting populations' access to markets and other social services while seriously hampering food deliveries.

    Food movement from Spinboldak to Hirat route (through Kandahar-Farah province) continues to be suspended due to the increasing security concerns over the last weeks. WFP's office in Hirat has not received any food since the beginning of June; stocks of wheat are critically low at 550 mt. Some 770,000 beneficiaries under various activities, including those affected by floods and engaged in food for training, will be impacted if the situation continues.

    Afghan deportees continue to flow into Afghanistan. Since 21 April nearly 100,000 deportees have entered the country. The United Nations have launched a joint CERF Appeal of US$ 5.9 million to cover the needs of deportee families for an initial period of three months (June to August 2007). As a part of this appeal, WFP has requested US$ 1.5 million to cover food needs of about 20,000 people so far, with an average of 80 new families expected each day in the coming months. Meanwhile, WFP continues to provide an emergency food relief to deportee families in Farah province and in the transit centre in Herat with its stocks available in the country. WFP has also planned to provide cooked food for two days to an average of 50 deportees entering through Islam Qala.

    For the next six months the overall operation still remains underfunded. Long lead time from contribution to food delivery, delays in export permissions (for Pakistan wheat), and insecurity further hinder WFP's response.

    WFP requires additional contributions in order to ensure distribution of cereals, pulses and high energy biscuits for next six months. This needs an immediate response from donors to avoid disrupting implementation of key activities.


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    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belize, Benin, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Jamaica, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Timor-Leste, Togo, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Western Sahara, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    Part I: Operational Requirements and Shortfalls

    Overview of the 2007 Programme of Work

    As the end of 2007 nears, the number of people the World Food Programme is seeking to support has risen to 83 million. The amount of food assistance required to assist these people is valued at US$3.4 billion. Considering resources mobilized thus far in 2007, the current level of funding falls short by some US$653 million.

    Additional resources amounting to approximately US$800 million are required before the end of 2007 to ensure uninterrupted food aid deliveries for ongoing activities. Therefore, the total current resourcing needs until the end of 2007 amount to US$1.5 billion. It is also equally critical at this time to mobilize resources to meet needs in early 2008. Needs for 2008 have been documented in detail in the "Projected 2008 Needs for WFP Projects and Operations" ("the Blue Book") which is available on WFP's website (www.wfp.org/Appeals).

    Since the last printing of this document for the Annual Session of the Executive Board (June 2007), beneficiaries have increased by nearly 5 million. This is attributable primarily to increased caseloads in Bangladesh, DPR Korea, Nepal and Côte d'Ivoire.

    The bulk of WFP's operations are focused in sub-Saharan Africa, which requires over 71 percent of total needs in 2007. Of this, Sudan with six different projects requires some 23 percent of the total needs, or US$769 million.

    In relative terms, the regional bureau with the greatest shortfall is the Latin American and Caribbean Bureau (ODP) which stands at 35.1 percent of 2007 needs unmet. This is closely followed by the Asia Bureau (ODB) with a shortfall of 34.8 percent. The sub-Saharan bureaux are showing shortfalls averaging around 13 percent, while the Middle East, Central Asia and Eastern Europe Bureau (ODC) is relatively the best resourced bureau, with only 0.6 percent of 2007 needs still to be raised. However, given the time lag between contributions being confirmed and food arriving in beneficiaries' hands, resources are urgently required to enable WFP to assist the needy in all geographic regions.

    In relative terms, EMOPs are the best resourced with 87 percent of needs met for 2007. The other programme categories are close behind with resourced levels of 85 and 82 percent for PRROs and Development respectively.


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    Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs
    Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Belize, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, India, Jamaica, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Oman, Pakistan, Peru, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Togo, Uganda, Uruguay

    "The number of people threatened by natural disasters had increased by three times over the last 30 years and the number of people affected by natural disasters doubled every 10 years. Tens of millions of people had been affected this year by floods in countries all over the world. The link between the increase in disasters and climate change, which had been predicted by scientists, was unmistakable. Also, more people were now living in exposed areas. Some of the biggest cities in the world were built in disaster zones. Their poorest inhabitants were living in slums near those disaster zones and were, therefore, even more vulnerable. That could lead to mega disasters in mega cities"

    -John Holmes, United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator

    Floods in Africa hit around 2 million people

    Some two million people have been affected by recent flooding in 22 countries in Africa, 650,000 have lost their homes, and 200 have been killed. These figures could increase in the weeks to come as the seasonal rains are expected to continue until the end of October. These floods coincide with the most critical time of the year, the lean season when West African families mostly in the Sahel region face food insecurity. The destruction of crop and food stocks has aggravated the vulnerability of poor families and needs to be addressed promptly through emergency and recovery interventions.

    West Africa

    West Africa is experiencing some of its worst floods in 35 years with over 800,000 affected in 15 countries (Mali, Burkina Faso, Guinea, Mauritania, Niger, Côte d'Ivoire, Senegal, Gambia, Liberia, Nigeria, Côte d'Ivoire, Togo, Sierra Leone, Benin and Ghana).

    The situation is especially worrisome in the following countries: Ghana (over 330,000 affected), Togo (over 120,000 affected), Burkina Faso (over 92,900 affected) and Mali (over 42,000 affected). The United Nations has allocated $4.9 million emergency humanitarian assistance to Mali ($1 million), Ghana ($2.5 million) and Togo ($1.4 million) in response to floods that have inundated these three countries since August.

    The CERF allocations are meant to immediately improve the living conditions of 155,000 people in these three countries - 75,000 in Ghana, 60,000 in Togo and 20,000 in Mali. The funding will support projects developed by the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), the World Food Programme (WFP), the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and the United DJERBA HOTEL ISIS ET SPA Fund (UNFPA), as well as their partners.

    On 4 October, United Nations and partner organizations launched a $10million Flash Appeal for Ghana, and on 26 October a $6 million for Burkina Faso.


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    Source: UN Children's Fund
    Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Swaziland, Timor-Leste, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

    FOREWORD

    In 2007, natural and man-made disasters continued to take a toll on the lives of people. Flooding, cyclones, landslides and tropical storms have threatened lives and livelihoods on every continent. And in many parts of the world, from Somalia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo to Iraq, Zimbabwe and Sudan, children and women continue to bear the brunt of conflict, displacement and deteriorating living conditions.

    An important lesson learned from major emergencies is that timely and flexible funding enables humanitarian actors to respond rapidly and most effectively to priorities established with national counterparts. To ensure timely availability of funds, UNICEF has increased its Emergency Programme Fund (EPF) to US$ 75 million per biennium.

    Throughout the year, UNICEF and its partners have worked to meet the needs and rights of affected children and women. Partnerships are key to making a lasting difference for them and UNICEF has focused on further expanding its partnerships with communities, governments, NGOs, UN agencies and the private sector. Experience has taught us that children and communities must be equipped with the knowledge and skills they need to better prepare and cope with disasters.

    Coordination is crucial for effective delivery of humanitarian aid. A strong supporter of humanitarian reform, UNICEF continues to work with its partners to improve the coordination of humanitarian response in all sectors. UNICEF is the global cluster lead for nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene and common data services. In education, UNICEF and the Save the Children Alliance are leading the cluster. The successful response to the floods in Mozambique is a good example of how improved coordination allows humanitarian actors to respond better to the needs of affected populations.

    UNICEF continues to strengthen its early warning system and country offices' preparedness to respond to disasters. Important measures are being taken to further enhance preparedness and response skills of UNICEF and its partners.

    The 2008 Humanitarian Action Report outlines UNICEF's appeal for 39 emergencies around the world. We count on the continued support and generosity of our donors to help ensure the survival, protection and well-being of women and children in these emergency situations.

    Ann M. Veneman
    Executive Director


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    Source: World Food Programme
    Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Honduras, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Kenya, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Uganda, Zimbabwe


    Funding Trends and Their Impact on Operations


    Analysis of the 2008 Programme of Work

    WFP's requirements dramatically increased, when a US$300 million budget revision for 2008 for Ethiopia was approved on 28 August. From January to June, Ethiopia's PRRO has seen its planned relief caseload quadrupling, from 1.2 million beneficiaries to 4.6 million because of the deadly effects of a severe drought. Now the operation needs an additional 380,000 mt of food to meet new requirements. The crisis is affecting the Horn of Africa, where the lives of 15.7 million vulnerable people in Somalia, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda and Djibouti are threatened. The situation is further exacerbated by high food prices (go to page 6 for an update on the crisis).

    Total 2008 gross needs for the organization's beneficiaries have risen by 14 percent (from US$4.9 to US$5.5 billion) over the past month alone and are projected to reach nearly US$6 billion by year-end. With US$4.4 billion already mobilized (including carry-over and confirmed contributions) and considering the US$1 billion that WFP must mobilize in advance to ensure continued pipeline activity, the total shortfall in resources currently stands just below US$2.3 billion.

    Compared to July 2008, the number of hungry poor receiving assistance has increased by over five million, to over 89 million. Besides the crisis in the Horn of Africa, the new EMOP in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea is supporting 4.8 million people affected by floods and rising food and fuel prices.

    Other budget revisions submitted for approval including Djibouti, Somalia, Chad, Zimbabwe and Afghanistan will further raise WFP's gross needs in the coming months. These budget revisions are currently under review and their value, which may change, is not accounted for in the Programme of Work until final approval.

    PRROs account for more than half of all of WFP's 2008 operations, while EMOPs are worth one-third, development less than 10 percent and special operations approximately 5 percent.



    WFP's Programme of Work by project category

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